Hundreds of tires among a huge pile of rubbish dredged up on the Plymouth coast

Plymouth waters are a bit cleaner. And it’s all thanks to a small army of volunteers who took part in a special project to make Ocean City live up to its name.

The cleanup led by Plymouth City Council came after the Plastic Pollution Prevention Project at the end of April saw divers tasked to dive deep into the waters of Mount Batten and Mutton Cove, near the Royal William Yard, with the aim of recovering any plastics that they possibly could.

The project, funded by Interreg as part of the council’s contributions to the Plastic Pollution Prevention Project, has seen a number of agencies across the city work together, the 1000 Tires Project, to tackle plastic pollution in the city ​​and its surrounding waters.

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Ahead of the cleanup George Gradon, diver and director of Commercial and Maritime Ltd said: “Looking at the crystal clear waters you would have no idea what lies beneath. There are so many problems in our oceans that we have hard to solve, but this, cleaning up litter, removing bikes, carts, tires and fishing lines we can do! It’s great to be part of a project working with others to make a real difference to the health of our waters around Plymouth.



A bike pulled out of the waters around Mount Batten and Mutton Cove

The volunteers finally hoisted:

* 2 Dumpy bags filled with fishing line (at least)

* 55 Bikes

* 22 Scooters

* 3 strollers

* 1 kart

* 1 Motorcycle

* 8 Trucks

* 60 car/truck tires

* 80 bicycle tires



Huge bike transport lifted from the waters around Mount Batten and Mutton Cove
Huge bike transport lifted from the waters around Mount Batten and Mutton Cove

The board said the loot included “much, much more and more”.

All trash was hauled ashore and sorted by a hardy group of volunteers provided by The 1000 Tires project who will help recycle the trash.



Volunteers worked tirelessly to ensure parts of Plymouth's waters were free of litter and litter
Volunteers worked tirelessly to ensure parts of Plymouth’s waters were free of litter and litter

A spokesperson for Plymouth City Council said: “The information provided by divers will allow us to better understand what type of material has been spilled in Plymouth Sound, allowing us to work with partners to clean it up now.

“Many thanks to the volunteers, our divers, Commercial Diver Training Ltd, and Mayflower Marina for their help with this program.”

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